Dsp Editor

The Dsp Editor allows you to assign, visualize and edit effects for all the mixer’s strips and system buses. Additionally it allows you to edit, organize, store and recall presets for every effect; and offers a quick and effective way to copy effects and/or parameters from different dsps.

To give you a clear picture (useful to understand the effect and quickly edit it as you desire), all the parameters are grouped into families, ordered according the audio signal path, and consistently color coded.

DSP effects edit panel

  1. The Dsp Editor panel is recalled through this button. Alternatively one can right click (long press) on every Dsp switch found in the mixer’s channel strips or system buses.
  2. This display shows the strip/bus the dsp effect we are editing is on.
  3. You can cycle through the currently switched on (and hence editable) dsps with these arrows. The display updates accordingly. Alternatively you can directly right click (long press) any active dsp switch to bring that effect into the editor.
  4. If the current instance of the program supports 2 insert effects (IFX) per part, with this button you can toggle between the two. The audio signal passes through the effects in this order: IFX A → IFX B. If only one IFX is supported, the button is dimmed.
  5. The current effect (algorithm) is shown here. A green background means the effect has been customised for the current style section. A white background means the effect is not customized. To toggle between the two states right click (long press) the display. More details about dsp effect customization can be found here. If present, both DSPs (IFX A/B) will be (un)customized at once.
  6. Within the current category (see next point) the effect can be changed by cycling with the arrows through all the available effects. Turning the mouse wheel over the effect name display is another way to cycle through the effects.
  7. With these buttons you change the effect category. Within the selected category you choose the desired effect with the arrows described at point [5].
  8. You can mute/bypass the shown dsp with this button. This button has the same effect as (and is linked to) the same named buttons found in mixer’s strips/buses under the dsp effect switches.
  9. The current effect’s parameters are logically grouped into families, listed according the signal path.
  10. You can tweak the parameter with this knob.
  11. If the parameters list does not fit the available space, you can scroll the list by dragging/swiping in this area or by turning the mouse wheel (with the pointer in this area).
  12. You can use these buttons to save (right click / long press) and recall user defined presets for every effect (= every effect has an independent set of 16 memory locations). These presets can be used as starting points for further customization. A used memory location turns blue, otherwise if empty it is grey. A memory location is considered empty when all the effect’s parameters have been reset to their default value (see later “RST P” button, point [17]). To clear a location, reset the parameters and then save into it. All the edits are automatically saved on disk and are persistent between sessions.
  13. With these arrows you can reorder the preset list. The highlighted preset (the last one selected) is moved up/down.
  14. Stores the current effect (algorithm + parameters) to be recalled later. Maybe to transfer it into another dsp (= into another mixer’s strip/bus). Or just to have a backup before experimenting deep editing, to be able to safely go back to the original settings.
  15. Recalls into the current dsp the previously saved effect. If the current dsp does not support the saved effect, this button is dimmed and unavailable.
  16. Swaps the current effect with the one in memory. If you are not satisfied with the change, swap again and you are back to the original situation (both for current effect AND memory content). If the current dsp does not support the saved effect, this button is dimmed and unavailable.
  17. You might want to transfer the common parameters from a similar effect. Let’s say you have a “Distortion” effect and want to try a “Distortion + Delay” effect. You save the Distortion effect, select the new “Distortion + Delay”, recall the parameters of the saved effect (so that the distortion part of the new effect matches the saved effect) and finally tweak the delay-related parameters of the new effect. Also the other way around is possible. This button is available (not dimmed) only when the current effect is similar to the saved one, and hence there are some common parameters. When this button is available, hovering the mouse on it will highlight the recalled parameter knobs (so that you know what is changed and what is not).
  18. Resets all the parameters to their default value. This can be used to start from “zero” and to clear the preset memory locations (see point [11]).
Pedal Wah

If you use an insert effect with a “pedal wah” component, you might want to drive the “pedal control” parameter in real time through a pedal sending CC messages (any controller, such as knobs and wheels, work as well).

Only insert dsps in lead or aux voices (the voices intended for user playing) may be controlled this way. You have to setup a binding for the “LEAD PEDWAH” or “AUX PEDWAH” commands with any CC you want (i.e.: your pedal, connected to any input port). One binding will target inserts in lead parts, the other in aux parts. Once the binding has been setup, then every time a “pedal wah” insert is placed in the lead/aux parts, it can be driven by the pedal. If no “pedal wah” effect is present, then the pedal will be ignored.

Also the system VAR dsp can be controlled, using the “VAR PEDWAH” command.

Rotary slow/fast

If you use an insert effect with a “rotary slow/fast” component, you might want to drive the “speed control” parameter in real time through a foot switch sending CC messages (any controller, including keys, will work).

Only insert dsps in lead or aux voices (the voices intended for user playing) may be controlled this way. You have to setup a binding for the “LEAD ROTSW” or “AUX ROTSW” commands with any CC you want (i.e.: foot switch, connected to any input port). One binding will target inserts in lead parts, the other in aux parts. Once the binding has been setup, then every time a “rotary slow/fast” insert is placed in the lead/aux parts, it can be driven by the foot switch. If no “rotary slow/fast” effect is present, then the foot switch will be ignored.

Also the system VAR dsp can be controlled, using the “VAR ROTSW” command.

Each time you press the switch, the rotor speed is toggled from slow to fast or vice versa. You do NOT have to keep the switch pushed. Just press and release it each time you want to change the current speed.